Five Tips for Finding a Job in Spain

Spain is a popular destination for both college graduates looking to travel and gain experience, and those searching for an adventure or change of pace. Many come to this country to teach English as an auxiliar de conversación (AKA a North American Language and Culture Assistant). They fall in love with the culture, the lifestyle, or simply make a life for themselves and don’t want to leave. For citizens of the EU, this process is much easier. For the rest, finding a job in order to secure a work visa can be a long and difficult process, especially post-pandemic.

There are a fair number of teaching jobs available, especially for those who are licensed teachers or have had their degrees recognized in Spain. However, finding a job in another field can be challenging. To help you with your search, here are my top five tips for landing a job in Spain.

1. Create a LinkedIn Profile 

You might not think of it, but when looking for a job in Spain, the first step is to set up a LinkedIn account. Fill in all the required fields, search for friends to connect with, and scroll through the news feed to find advice that might help further shape your profile page. The app is a great way to both advertise yourself to potential employers and to network with other working professionals.

LinkedIn is one of the primary ways that both employers and prospective employees connect in Spain, especially in big cities like Madrid and Barcelona. Make a profile that sells you and your skills. Remember, at the end of the day, LinkedIn is a social media app and you should cater your profile to capture potential employers’ attention as they’re searching for candidates.

Tip: Keep it professional! LinkedIn should not be treated as normal social media.

2. Network ‘til You Get Work

Make as many professional contacts as possible. This can be in-person or through LinkedIn. Attend social events and chat with people there to start making connections with people from different fields. These events can range from pub trivia to morning yoga in the park to art classes. Whatever your interests, be open, friendly, and make an effort to get to know at least one or two other people in attendance. On LinkedIn, an effective way to network is to send a request to connect with any and everyone in your field. This builds a web of contacts on the app which can help you to find jobs and also helps potential employers to find you. 

3. Build Your Skills and Buff Up Your CV

It’s also important to continue working on your CV and professional development while you look for a job. Hone skills that might help you. If you’re thinking about teaching, for example, consider getting some certifications. Likewise, if you’re looking into translation, consider offering your services for free, especially to local nonprofit organizations. As you continue to build your professional profile, make sure to keep your CV up to date and try to include details that set you apart from the competition.

4. Send Your CV Everywhere — and I Mean Everywhere

Send out your CV, not just to jobs that you want or jobs you think you might fit, but to any job remotely related to your field. If it looks interesting, apply. You never know where you might find an opportunity! And don’t be afraid to apply to that dream job, even if you feel like you’re not quite experienced enough. If you don’t get it the first time, you can always apply again in the future with more experience. In fact, your continued interest in the company could be a point in your favor!

Tip: Nowadays, most companies will expect to receive a CV via email rather than in-person or by mail.

5. Persistence Is Key

Most importantly, don’t give up. Be persistent and don’t get discouraged. Finding a job takes time. It’s perfectly normal to be rejected multiple times, especially if you’re looking for a company that is also willing to sponsor a work visa. Spain is one of the EU countries with the highest rate of unemployment, especially among young people, so don’t feel like a failure if you don’t find a job right away. Be patient, take it one day at a time, and keep trying!

Looking for a job in any country can be a long and arduous process, and that is especially true in a country such as Spain; with high levels of youth unemployment. However, you can get a leg up on the competition by creating a well-developed LinkedIn profile and remaining active on it. Additionally, you can use the platform to network and connect with other working professionals and potential employers. Keep building your skills and improving both your resumé and LinkedIn account. The more knowledgeable you are, the better chance you’ll have of landing that job. Above all, persist. Don’t give up, because the next job you apply for might be the opportunity you’ve been looking for. 

Sarah Perkins Guebert Winning Wednesdayby Sarah Perkins Guebert

How to Get TEFL Certification in Five Steps

I withdrew from my college’s study abroad program before I even left the country. I wanted to see the world and did not want to do it while in a traditional school setting.

Although I had heard of TEFL as a way to live abroad, I didn’t really know how to get started. Eventually, I decided to take a TEFL certification course in Phuket, Thailand in late 2018 and now I’ve been living abroad ever since.  

How’d that happen? Here’s a step-by-step guide of everything I did before getting on a plane. I hope it helps you better understand how to get TEFL certification and eventually start teaching English abroad.   

Step 1: Be Introspective and Ask Yourself These Questions

Why do you want to take a TEFL course? Maybe you just need a break from your daily 9-5 job or you’re transitioning from one career to another. Perhaps you are in a similar position that I was: freshly graduated and in search of a sustainable life abroad because you’ve never left your comfort zone. There isn’t a right or wrong reason for taking a TEFL course, but you should know why you want to take one.

questions what do you mean

Do you have any interest in teaching? Interest is defined as the state of wanting to know or learn about something or someone. A more specific question would be, “Do you want to know or learn more about teaching?” In my case, yes, I did (and still do). I have a background in mostly math and science education as well as the scientific study of languages; I figured a TEFL course could help bridge those two things together. 

Step 2: Consider the Qualifications for TEFL Certification

The good news is you don’t need many qualifications for TEFL certification — after all, it’s considered an entry-level training course. When I took the course, I had just graduated from college and had about three years of teaching experience. Based on all the people in my own course, my qualifications and level of experience definitely aren’t the norm. I met people who didn’t have a degree and/or hadn’t been in school in over a decade. Specific requirements vary, but all you really need is a good attitude, willingness to learn, and an open mind.

Step 3: Choose a TEFL Course

map places tour

A quick Google search of “TEFL course” will bring up over 8 million results, so I understand how choosing a course can be overwhelming. I had five requirements when choosing a course: 

  1. Website Do they have their own website? In the age of the internet, it’s rare that a company or business doesn’t have a website, which is what makes having a website an entry-level requirement for me. Other questions I also consider are: Are prices and product laid out clearly? Is contact information easily accessible? Do they link their social media? Does it look well maintained?
  2. Reviews When I shop on Amazon, reviews are what ultimately get me to buy a product. Picking a TEFL course is no different. Unfortunately, there isn’t an Amazon for TEFL courses. There are actually several places to find reviews. The first place is on the TEFL course’s website itself. A good TEFL course will also showcase reviews from external websites, such as GoOverseas and TEFL Course Review. The more reviews you can find, the more accurate representation of the course you’ll get.
  3. Social Media A course not participating in social media was a deal breaker for me. If a course had an active social media presence, it showed me that there’s a human being managing their social media, which instantly makes them more real and personable. You can also now review businesses on Facebook. I went a step further with my social media requirement and messaged a graduate of TEFL Campus on Facebook. 
  4. Accreditation/Validation Be sure the course you choose is accredited or validated by an outside source. There are several TEFL/TESOL accrediting bodies; be sure to do your research on which bodies are legitimate and internationally recognized. Believe it or not, many courses accredit themselves or have simply paid for the accreditation without the company doing any real due diligence.
  5. Job Support This is actually a requirement I added on after having looked at a few TEFL courses. Let’s face it: nothing in life is guaranteed, so “guaranteed job placement” seemed way too good to be true. What drew me to TEFL Campus was that they explicitly state, “We don’t guarantee placements.”

TEFLCampus

Step 4: Choose a Country for the Course and for Work

If you follow my guidelines above for choosing a course, it doesn’t really matter where you go for the course. Choosing where you want to work though is a bit more complicated. Besides personal requirements such as: beaches or mountains, city or small village, yearly weather, etc., some countries have strict professional requirements. For example, in order to teach in South Korea, you must have a bachelor’s degree and be a citizen of certain countries. But to teach in some countries like Cambodia and Russia, you don’t need a degree.  Countries like Thailand and Vietnam list it as an official requirement, but employers commonly turn a blind eye to this. Do some research before hopping on a plane. 

TEFL Certification in Five Steps

Step 5: Prepare to Leave Home for a TEFL Certificate

Have a savings and be financially responsible. Be sure you have enough for the course and to get you through one month after the course ends while you look for a job. The cost of living in some Asian countries are significantly lower. For instance, TEFL Campus suggests coming over with no less than $3,000 after having paid for your TEFL course and accommodation for it.

Check your passport’s expiration date. Make sure your passport is valid for at least six months following your course. Getting a new passport can take a few weeks. 

Check if you need additional travel documents to get into a country. Depending on your passport, you may need additional travel documents, such as a visa, to get into a country. 

luggage packing trip abroad TEFL CertificationGet a criminal background check. Most schools will ask for a background check and it is significantly easier to get one while you’re home than while you’re abroad. Depending on what type of background check you get, it can take a few weeks to get results. 

Find your original degree (if applicable). Most schools will ask to see your original degree and some countries may even ask for it to be certified. 

Before Loading the Plane for You TEFL Certification

Buy your plane ticket ASAP. The earlier you buy a plane ticket, the cheaper it will be. It’s not like domestic travel where there’s a magic number of days for the cheapest price. 

Notify your bank of travel plans. Trust me, you don’t want your card getting declined when you’re 13,000 km from home. Banks need advanced notice that you’re planning to make transactions from abroad — be sure they’re aware. 

Start packing. Dig up or buy some suitcases and start sorting your things into,  ‘take,’ ‘trash/donate,’ and ‘keep, but can’t take’ piles. Then go back and make that ‘take’ pile smaller and smaller. You’re looking to live abroad, not take your life abroad. 

Spend time with friends and family. This is the most regretful step for me. I was so caught up with finishing school and preparing to move abroad, I didn’t spend as much time with my friends and family as I wanted. If you have the time, use it. 

Packing your life up to do something you’ve probably never done before in a foreign country is scary when getting your TEFL certification. That is a perfectly normal thought and you aren’t alone in it. Hopefully, these steps have brought you some guidance, reassurance, and courage to follow through with it. Good luck!

 

Learning as a Teaching Assistant in Ontinyent, Spain

edgar llivisupa profile photoEdgar Llivisupa is a native New Yorker completing a dual degree in Business Journalism and Spanish Literature and Language. His goals while teaching abroad are to improve his Spanish, test his capabilities as a teacher, and to travel. 

Edgar has been living in Ontinyent, Spain for one school year. Ontinyent is located in eastern Spain near Valencia. He is a teaching assistant at a primary school and will be returning to the same school this September. He enjoys learning Valencian and interacting with the locals. 

Edgar is looking forward to returning for another year. He wants to continue his progress with his students and dive deeper into the Spanish culture and lifestyle.

Meet Edgar 

Why did you choose to come to Spain and Europe? 

“There were many motivations for me to live abroad. Firstly, it had been rare in my life for me to venture outside New York. In fact, I had traveled out of the tri-state area only a handful of times, so I was itching to leave. Secondly, after failing a calculus course I switched my major to Spanish and started taking more intensive coursework. During a literature class, the professor flagged up  the North American Language and Culture Assistants Program. As an American, there was already an innate curiosity to visit Europe. As a descendant of Hispanics, I was also inquisitive about Spanish culture and how much it influenced Latin America. Thirdly, I had a brother living in Madrid. This put me at ease after reading online testimonials from other participants in the program.”

Why did you choose to teach abroad? 

“While I had considered studying abroad in the past, the costs made it seem out of reach. I was never the type to look for grants or scholarships to aid my studies. Alongside that, I would have to pick courses that would grant me credits at my college. Instead, this program gave me the opportunity to work abroad, which made me more comfortable rather than going abroad as a student. I hadn’t considered teaching before, but regardless, I have approached my tasks and responsibilities with an open mind and strived to do my best.”

Have you ever taught before? If not, what were you doing before you decided to move abroad?  

“I’ve never taught before. Rather, I was working very close to home at a pharmacy. It had nothing to do with what I was majoring in, but I wanted some work experience and a reference for the future just in case. Earning my own money felt rewarding as it lessened my dependence on my parents and when I decided to participate in the program, it meant I could start saving for my year abroad.”

What did you think teaching abroad would be like? Where are you teaching? 

“I am an English teaching assistant at a primary school in Ontinyent, Spain, located in the Valencian Community.

I had a feeling that teaching abroad would be extremely difficult as I had no previous experience. And I had been put off it as a career by what my public school teachers had to say about it.

I also had no idea what my students’ proficiency level would be so thank God for the chance to do some homework on them on the Internet. The school’s online blog gave me a great insight into the faculty, the students, and what the school looked like. There were documents on the English classes, their textbooks and other learning materials. I was also heartened to see that the school had recently embarked on a cultural exchange with public schools in Africa. So my arrival wasn’t going to be jarring as they had already opened their hearts and minds to another culture.”

What expectations did you have before you came here?

“I had no expectations coming to Ontinyent. That isn’t to say that I wasn’t looking forward to it. Knowing I had finally made it out of New York meant I was aware that I would have a good time regardless of where I wound up.”

cityscape ontinyent spain

What were your perceptions of Ontinyent during your first year?

“Again, I had the Internet to thank for discovering that it wasn’t amongst the most isolated towns in the region (looking at you there, Bocairent). I saw there was a decently-sized shopping mall with chains like Zara and GAME (an equivalent of GameStop), as well as a movie theater. All of the major Spanish banks were there. And most important of all, there was a train station to Valencia. 

By the end of the first year, I had learned that family is highly valued in Ontinyent. At least once a week, regardless of work or social schedules, the family, from grandparents to grandchildren, will share a meal together.”

What were some of the accomplishments of your first year?

“Moving and living abroad is a big accomplishment in itself with all the changes it has brought  me. I had never lived away from home or on my own before. Suddenly in my own flat, there was no one to clean up, cook, or pay the bills. Those responsibilities all fell on me.

Ontinyent newspaper

Many people had warned me that the town isn’t ideal for young people with few nightlife options or places to hang out. Instead I just traveled to the major cities before returning to the calm of Ontinyent. It was a great balance for me.”

What do you want to achieve for your second year? 

“As much as I strive to plan my life (after all, I first heard of this program three years ago), I have no idea where it is going. This year, I am going to lay foundations  in case I decide to relocate to Ontinyent for good. This includes continuing to study the local language, Valencian, which is a dialect of Catalan. 

I want to attend Spanish language courses. While I know enough to be considered a native speaker, I still lack confidence. So it would help to be more proficient and understand the basic facets of the language. 

Also, while I can assume I did a decent enough job to warrant a warm and lovely “see you soon!” party at my school, I do feel that there is a lot I can improve on. Since I’m returning to the same center, I don’t have to spend the first few months meeting the faculty and students or familiarizing myself with the town. Like I told some of my co-workers, I come back ready to work!”

What advice would you give to other participants about your first year? What are some of the things they must do and some things they must absolutely not do? 

“The most important thing to realize about this program is that it is going to take a while to adjust to living in Spain if you’re not in a major city. You’re not going to easily find foreign cuisine or people who want to, or can, speak English. By the time I acclimatized to living abroad, which for me was around the New Year, I was already at the halfway point of my tenure. Keep that in mind if it takes you longer to adjust to a new surrounding.

Another piece of advice I have, and this is more personal, regards technology. Yes, it makes us all connected but while it is great to talk to loved ones back home, attempt to disconnect once in a while. Enjoy your newfound independence in a different setting.”

How do you feel about your integration into the culture so far? How did you prepare before you arrived? 

“Before my arrival, I explored the town’s tourism website and looked at the traditional dishes, holidays, and festivals celebrated throughout the year. Being in a small town helped me integrate easier than a tenure in Madrid or Barcelona. There aren’t fast-food chains to satisfy my American tastebuds. The stores in Ontinyent close around 8pm. And my town is also multi-generational.

Now that it’s a year later, I can say it was a great change for me. I am happy to be away from New York. Ontinyent was the perfect size for me. Living in big cities can cause anxiety if you don’t have a big weekend planned or spend too much time at home. Choices are limited in a small town. Most weekends entail a simple football match or drinks at someone’s apartment. I appreciated simple living. When I went on trips during vacation or long-weekend excursions, I had a greater drive to explore and enjoy my time away.

Culture Shock Made Easy

Since I am of Hispanic descent, there wasn’t much of a culture shock. The passion for football extended to my family, so I ended up attending a match at every stadium of the eight La Liga teams based in Madrid and Valencia. I was even able to attend the trophy ceremony for Valencia CF’s triumph in the Copa del Rey, the Spanish domestic cup competition.

The lack of a language barrier also made it seamless to fit in. I didn’t have much of an opportunity to stand out as a foreigner. However, with my co-workers and their family and friends, it was always fun to let them introduce themselves in English. I would always follow in Spanish and leave them astonished. It meant I was able to meet everyone in a more personable fashion. They would ask me about my life in New York and how I was adapting. Meanwhile, I would ask them about their life in a small town.

teaching abroad

Looking Forward to a Future in Ontinyent

Alongside that, learning Valencian has helped a lot. Understanding a conversation between two native speakers, saying that I was taking classes, or just switching from Spanish to Valencian continually impressed people. They couldn’t believe a New Yorker was not only interested in their language but was making a serious effort to be proficient in it even as they considered it “useless for my future in the country.” Even today, weeks removed from Ontinyent, I still think in Valencian.   

I had an enjoyable year in Ontinyent, and I’ve met some of the most generous and accommodating people. Because I have traveled around so much, I’ve seen more of Spain in one year than most people I know who’ve had the opportunity to visit in all their years of living in Spain. While I have a hard time measuring how well I’ve integrated into my new town, it has been enough that a few months away is difficult for me. I am eagerly looking forward to my second year.”

An Expat Living and Working Abroad in Ontinyent, Spain

Edgar shares details about his first year abroad living and working in Ontinyent, Spain. He provides guidance for first-year teachers who are just arriving. Expat life is not easy. It can take longer than one expects. After having lived in the Ontinyent area for a year, Edgar feels as if he has made friends at work and started to better understand the language. He is trying his best to learn and understand Valencian and they appreciate his willingness to do so. It takes time. Sometimes expats live abroad for years and still don’t feel a sense of full familiarity within their new home. Edgar plans to try his best in his second year to understand the culture better by perfecting Valencian.

We look forward to hearing more about Edgar’s second year in Ontinyent. Stay tuned for his second update in the late fall. 

by Leesa Truesdell

The Opportunity to Teach and Travel

by Ellen Hietsch

alex warhall hiking

For a second year in a row, Alex Warhall and I have found ourselves stateside as summer saunters into Madrid. While I’m admittedly glad to be away from the stifling heat, I miss the tranquility that sneaks into Madrid’s normally stuffed streets at the height of summer as most of the city flees to summits and seasides. “Eh, everyone leaves in the summer, you’re not missing much,” friends told me as I complained about being dragged back to the US by bureaucracy yet again. But Madrid in August will always be wondrous to me. It hearkens back to my arrival at the dawn of the month nearly two years ago. Read all about his second interview and teaching at a bilingual school in Madrid, Spain here.

I met Alex on our first day in the city. He appears in all of my most important memories of that magical August. A time when the nightly festivities and languid afternoons spooked away any anxieties we’d had. While aspects of our teaching experiences have diverged, our mindsets about living in Madrid have run parallel from year to year as we’ve grown more attached to the city. What Alex initially considered to be a year-long break from his career stateside has morphed into preparations to teach in Madrid for a third year. Alex has paused from his busy summer job mentoring international high school students in Boston to explain what led to this decision.

What was the most important thing you learned while living abroad?

“The most important thing I’ve learned while living abroad is to enjoy as many moments as I can — good moments and more notably bad ones, too. Living abroad comes with highs and lows. On the one hand, I’ve had the opportunity to travel throughout Europe and beyond. I’ve met new people and built lifelong friendships. On the other hand, I’ve dealt with the stress of apartment hunting while speaking a foreign language. I’ve experienced those awkward lonely moments while solo traveling. I’ve also struggled with being far away from my family and friends back home.

Amid these highs and lows, I’ve seen real growth in myself. When I say that I enjoy the low moments, I don’t mean that I love being stressed out, awkward, or sad. Instead, I mean that I’ve learned to appreciate the moments when I step outside my comfort zone. I know that means I’m becoming the person I set out to be when I moved abroad.”

How have you done with accomplishing your goals while living in Madrid?

“I feel that I have done quite well in accomplishing my goals while living abroad. Living abroad itself has been a goal of mine for as long as I can remember. So that goal is checked off. Learning a foreign language has been another goal of mine. I’m certainly not fluent in Spanish yet. Nonetheless, I have made major progress for someone who has studied for only two years.

Another goal of mine has been to grow more comfortable with performing in public. This year, I proudly played my ukulele and sang at an open mic night with one of my best friends. I’m excited to continue playing at these events this upcoming school year. Lastly, at the age of 23, I told myself that I’d run a marathon by the time I was 25. This year, at the age of 26, I successfully completed my first marathon while in Madrid. Although I did it a year later than my target age, I am still very pleased with the result. In fact, I find it quite poetic that I ran 26 miles at the age of 26. Living in Madrid has given me the opportunity to accomplish many goals I set for myself. I’m excited to see what this year brings.” 

What has been the biggest challenge about living abroad and what advice would you give on how to deal with that challenge?

“The biggest challenge about living abroad for me is definitely the language barrier. Having never studied Spanish in my life until moving abroad, my time in Madrid has been one continuous Spanish lesson. Though I consider myself to be highly motivated when it comes to learning the language, I have my days where I am too tired to translate my thoughts into Spanish. Other days, I prefer to speak in English so that I can express myself more deeply. As a result, I will spend much of my time with my English-speaking friends (mostly because I love their company) because it’s more comfortable for me.

traveling abroad

However, I’ve realized that much of my personal growth in the language occurs when I put myself in uncomfortable situations like going out with my Spanish coworkers despite anticipatory thoughts such as, “What are we going to talk about all night? Will I speak in the correct tense?” My advice for dealing with this struggle is to be confident in the Spanish that you’ve developed, and accept that you may not speak or understand perfectly every time. Making mistakes is the best way to improve. If you do this, it is likely that you will put yourself in situations where you will be able to grow.” 

Do you have any advice for other auxiliars interested in traveling while teaching abroad?

“My advice to other auxiliars who want to travel is to say, “yes.” If you’re unsure or hesitant about buying a ticket somewhere because it doesn’t exactly align with your budget for the month, say “yes.” Buy the ticket. If your coworkers invite you on a trip, but you were looking forward to staying in Madrid for the weekend, say “yes.” Every time I step off of a plane or train or bus and into a new city, I am always glad I decided to say “yes” to that opportunity. If you’re living abroad and you love to travel, but you find yourself hesitating on a destination for some reason, say “yes” to it. I’ve never regretted going anywhere, and I doubt you will. Sometimes it is a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

How has teaching abroad helped with your overall professional goals?

“I originally arrived in Madrid, Spain back in August 2017. I had just left behind my job as a copywriter in New York in pursuit of travel and good memories. Professional goals were not my main concern at the time. However, after spending two full school years working with the same students, I’ve realized that I enjoy teaching young children my native language. With this realization, I have been taking my job as an educator more seriously. As a result, I’ve improved my classroom management and lesson planning skills. It has become apparent that my main reason for returning to Spain is not for travel anymore (which I still do and value highly). Rather, it is to enhance my abilities as an educator. Truly, teaching abroad has raised my interest in pursuing a career in education.”

What was your most memorable moment in class? How do you feel now that school is ending?

“My sixth grade students and I worked on a performance for their graduation this year. During the final weeks of the school year, the students practiced singing the song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” while I accompanied them on the ukulele. After two weeks of rehearsal, we performed the song at graduation in front of their families and friends. It went incredibly well despite the fact that we mumbled one of the verses to the song. At the end of the day, I think we captured the mood of the song by laughing it off together. This performance, to me, was the culmination of all the great times those sixth graders and I had spent in class together. I feel a little sad, but mainly proud. After two school years of working with them, I was proud to be part of their graduation.”

picture of spain

Since you are staying in Spain another year, will you be teaching at the same school? How do you feel about that?

“I will be teaching at the same school next year, making it my third consecutive year at this school. I’m really excited to return for a couple of reasons. The first reason is that I get the chance to reconnect with my coworkers that are also returning. The second reason is that I will get to see the growth and development of the students that I have been working with for the past two school years.” 

What is the most important piece of advice you can give someone wanting to Teach Abroad?

“For anyone who wants to give teaching abroad a try, I think it’s important to remember to keep an open mind and limit your expectations. Jump at the opportunity to teach abroad. I learned about Teach Abroad from a friend. When he described the program to me, I was excited to have a similar experience. After I got my school placement and started my job, I quickly realized that my experience was going to different than my friend’s. For example, he was teaching business professionals and only taught three sessions per day. This resulted in a schedule with more free time than mine. I found that my expectations definitely differed from reality. Nonetheless, I found that keeping an open mind allowed me to see the benefits that my school offered rather than fixate on what I didn’t have. 

I have a two hour lunch break where I can practice my Spanish and connect with my coworkers. I also get easy access to tutoring jobs in the neighborhood where I work. Fortunately, I don’t have to bounce around from neighborhood to neighborhood to give lessons in business English. If you’re someone who has discovered Teach Abroad through a friend, just remember that their experience — whether good or bad — will not be your experience. They can give you an idea of what to expect. However, don’t be surprised if your experience is totally different. In all likelihood it will be. Your experience will be unique in many ways that are personal to you. And that’s the beauty of Teach Abroad.”

The Opportunity to Teach and Travel

Alex is a determined person who has found a home in Madrid that fosters the realization of his dreams. After witnessing first-hand the journeys that his open-minded attitude made possible and further understanding his poignant philosophies through our conversations, I’m excited to see what year three holds for him.
If you would like to the opportunity to teach while traveling, connect with our facebook group to ask questions.
mountain view the opportunity to travel and teach

Finding Balance After Spain

Sam Loduca was born in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin but has lived the majority of her adult life in large cities such as Chicago and Madrid. After living in Madrid for two years, Sam moved back to Chicago and landed a job in human resources at a consulting firm. Her focus is on placing employees in different locations around the world. Sam got a degree that specializes in human resources and was working in human resources before she moved to Madrid for two years.

Finding Balance After Spain

After returning from Madrid, Sam wanted to work in a profession that combined international affairs and human resources. Sam’s new role does just that and much more. Although she doesn’t have as much free time as she did in Madrid, Sam explained that her new role provides her with a sense of fulfillment. She is helping others achieve their travel goals and dreams.

What have you been up to since leaving Dreams Abroad?

“Since leaving Dreams Abroad, I remained in Spain for an additional year of teaching English. Since then, I have returned to the states. I’ve begun working at a consulting firm as a global mobility professional. I moved back to Chicago (where I was living before my time in Spain) and had to readjust to the old life I was used to there. I miss Spain every day and have already been back once to visit. Now, I am focusing on my career. I’m spending time with the friends and family I didn’t get to see much when I was abroad.”

castle in spain

What is your best Dreams Abroad memory?

“I really enjoyed our monthly meetings where our diverse group met and talked through our experiences. We would brainstorm ideas for articles and topics that would be helpful to other people working and teaching abroad. It’s truly fascinating to see a group of people all working in the same job, living in the same city, all from the same country, and how different their tales of the experience were!”

What are your future plans?

“My future plans include continuing to develop my career in international business. Hopefully, I will be able to do so by living abroad again. I’d love to live in Europe, South America, or Asia.

I am also working on obtaining my Italian citizenship. Going international will be a bit easier if I want to live or work there.”

What would you say to someone interested in traveling abroad to teach, work, study, or just to travel?

“Do it!! Don’t give yourself excuses like it’s not the right time, I will go later, etc. Go now – it will never be the right time to leave everything behind and go on an adventure, so you have to just do it!

Finding Balance After Spain

Don’t do it just because you think it would be fun. It will be sooooo much fun! BUT… to truly flourish in another culture, you really need to put yourself out of your comfort zone. If you aren’t willing to do that, you might as well save your money and stay home. Start conversations with people — ask lots of questions about why people do things the way they do them there (it is OK to acknowledge that people and cultures are different and try to learn why). It’s absolutely necessary to try things you wouldn’t normally try (hobbies, food, styles).

It will be one of the most rewarding things you ever do in your life. It’s hard, it’s exhausting, and because of that, it is truly life-changing.”

Finding Balance After Traveling

book store in spain libros

Around the time of this interview, Sam had just returned from her second trip to Madrid to visit the city that she will always call home. Looking back at her first interview, Sam still remembers the need to feel the nature of her life slow down and she felt it while living in Madrid for two years. Even though she took some time to smell the roses, Sam also understands the American way of life and is thriving in her job.

Sam, like many of us who have lived abroad, struggles with having one version of herself still in Madrid while still remaining content and present in her home country, the USA. She is looking forward to learning new things as a global mobility professional. She continues to travel when able. We are so happy she is found her sense of fulfillment. We look forward to hearing from Sam in the future.

This is Sam’s favorite quote from her first interview; I thought it would be an exceptional way to wrap up this piece:

“Every one of a hundred thousand cities around the world had its own special sunset and it was worth going there, just once, to see the sun go down” – Ryu Murakami

Finding balance is no easy task while traveling or working abroad, or even afterwards! If you want to meet like-minded travelers please join our Facebook group. There you can keep up with Dreams Abroad members and their stories.

by Leesa Truesdell

 

Which Study Abroad Program is Right for You?

So, you’ve decided you want to study and live abroad. Congratulations! Studying abroad is a fantastic way to see the world, expand your horizons, and learn something new – in and outside of the classroom. Once you’ve decided to study abroad, your next step will be to decide which type of study abroad program is right for you.

After you’ve made that decision though, what’s next? How do you decide where to go and how long to stay? Once you know which type of program is right for you, here are some resources and ideas to get you started on brainstorming your study abroad experience.

on a school trip

Research the Big Names in Your Program Type

Maybe you’ve decided you want to do a language program abroad to improve your speaking skills. Look into the different companies you could go abroad with. Which seem to have the best reputation/most programs? Where are their centers, and how long do they recommend going for? It’s also a great idea to read student reviews of these programs. Reviews are highly likely to highlight issues you may run into abroad.

You can gather this information relatively easily on the internet. Then, whether you decide to go abroad with a large company or prefer to go with a smaller one, you’ll have lots of perspectives to help you make your decision.

college students

Talk to an Advisor About Study Abroad Programs

If you’re planning a semester abroad as part of your undergraduate degree, talking to a trusted advisor is a great place to start. This is particularly if you will study abroad through your home college/university. An advisor in your study abroad office can tell you what your best options are and which programs are likely to transfer credits towards your degree. They can also weigh in on location, duration of a program, and other considerations like finances, language, and more.

Though this approach might work best for traditional study abroad programs, it can also work for other types as well. Reach out to other types of advisors and mentors. Perhaps a professor of yours might be familiar with language programs. Maybe a family friend knows about a great volunteer program abroad. Having lots of conversations about study abroad will help you find the right fit.

Follow a Passion

study abroad program

If you’re having a hard time knowing where to start when it comes to picking a place, thinking about your passions can help a lot. Perhaps if you’re passionate about history, you could think of what kind or era sparks the most curiosity for you. If you love sports, where could you go to engage in that by joining a local team? Connecting over interests is a great way to become part of a community while living abroad, so it’s not a bad way to help you figure out where to go.

Go Somewhere that Will Help Advance Your Studies and/or Career

It also makes a lot of sense to study abroad in a way that will move your studies/career forward as well. These days, many companies are looking for I. Just going abroad is marketable, but going abroad to attend school or work is a great idea.

Maybe your university has a great business exchange program worth looking into (if that’s the career you’d like to pursue). Or, if it’s advantageous to speak another language, a program that focuses on language skills might be best. Perhaps a volunteer program would give you the necessary management/community outreach experience. Thinking about how your short- and long-term goals will pay off down the road.

Finding the Right Study Abroad Program for You

I knew for a long time that I wanted to study abroad. But finding programs that were a good fit for me involved personal interest, location, academic requirements, and so much more. Doing thorough research, talking to advisors, professors, other faculty and family members, and following my intuition helped me decide what was right for me. With the right tools, you can make an informed decision about where and how to go abroad too – and gain so much from the experience.

study abroad students

by Emma Schultz

From Auxiliar to Studying Data Science

 

Justin Hughes-Coleman lived in Madrid, Spain for two years where he taught as an auxiliar. While there, he connected with other expats and became part of the Dreams Abroad team. Justin moved back to the US this past summer and is now thriving in San Francisco, California, where he is studying data science. We are excited to share his update with you.

DogWhat have you been up to since leaving Dreams Abroad?

Since leaving Dreams Abroad, I have had a lot of life changes. I moved back to the US from Spain and am currently enrolled in a Data Science boot camp. I live in the Bay Area in California and recently, got a new dog.

What is our best Dreams Abroad memory?

One of my best Dreams Abroad memories is when we met at La Gatoteca, a cat cafe in central Madrid. A few of the DA members, myself included, were really looking forward to spending time discussing our lives and goals in Madrid surrounded by adorable cats. However, many more members were not exactly thrilled to pay to spend time with cats and a few members just waited for us outside. The silly memory sticks out so much because it demonstrates the strong will many members have and it felt like the foundations of what was to come during the rest of our time abroad. I feel many members have grown to have a stronger sense of themselves and it was nice to grow along with them and Dreams Abroad.

What are your plans?

Justin Hughes-Coleman

One of my main desires is to pursue my need to travel. My three-year goal is to start my career as a data scientist so I can work remotely. Once I’ve become established, I hope to begin semi-long-term traveling again. I don’t think I want to live any place for longer than a year. I would like the flexibility to pick up and go live wherever the road takes me.

What would you say to someone interested in traveling abroad to teach, work, study, or just to travel?

If there are any hurdles that seem to make traveling not worth it, trust me. Traveling is worth overcoming every one of those hurdles. Travel, quite literally, opened up the world to me. Every amazing moment I experienced while abroad shaped me to be the person I have always wanted to be; someone that knows their potential and wants to help others reach theirs. All the people I’ve met along the way have made the world seem limitless with possibilities. While traveling, I met families that do nothing but travel and people that make a positive impact while living abroad. Traveling can show you the world and the best way to experience it: with your own eyes.

by Leesa Truesdell